The Real Know How

How-Tos, Videos, Tutorials — Ramping Up for the 21st Century

Archive for the category “recipe”

How To Make Oat, Nut or Seed Milk

Nutritionist Samantha Peris shows us how to make oat, nut or seed milk. She uses oats as the main ingredient for the milk in this video.

How To Make Flour Tortillas

Here’s a step-by-step on how to make flour tortillas.

The poster, abrahamdiaz writes “This is the traditional recipe made in northern Mexico. Ingredient measurements should be followed exactly as shown in instructions; water quantity may vary depending on desired mixture texture. This recipe makes about 18 tortillas.”

His recipe uses vegetable shortening – since that’s a modern product – that wouldn’t be traditional. Maybe in the past they would have used lard. But he anyway, gives a substitution measurement for vegetable oil.

Here’s mszeineb’s veg oil version:

From Fruit Leather to Fruit Drink

Another use, this one quite old, for fruit leather/dehydrated fruit puree. Apparently, in the Middle East dried apricot puree is made into a refreshing fruit drink.

The fruit leather is reconstituted by soaking in warm water for several hours (overnight) – can also be put into the blender to speed things along – then it is refrigerated. You can adjust the amount of water and add a sweetener if you feel it necessary at this point.

The following videos show two slightly different techniques. A warning that the background music in both is fairly loud (I’d mute it, as there is no talking in either video, just visual demonstration).

Easy Way To Clabber Raw Whole Milk

Wardeh Harmon (Gnowfglins) in southwestern Oregon makes sour cream for her family and soured (clabbered) milk for her chickens and dog from raw milk she gets from the family cow.

She writes, “We get around 4 gallons of milk per day from our Jersey cow. For our family, this is plenty to make cheese, butter, kefir, ice cream and more — plus we have some to share with friends AND some to clabber (spontaneously sour) for the chickens and dog. I figured out a really easy way to get both clabber for the chickens and sour cream for us, with hardly any work at all.”

How to Make Powdered Eggs

Here’s a video on how to make powdered eggs using a flour mill. The eggs are cooked in a nonstick pan, dehydrated and then run through a flour mill a couple times until powdered.

Teflon is nasty stuff, so I hope she uses a ceramic coated non-stick pan — and probably things would be more efficient in a dehydrator (store bought or rigged).

Apparently eggs prepared this way can be rehydrated to make scrambled eggs and other egg dishes or added without rehydrating to baked goods recipes and can last 5-10 years if stored in an airtight container.

Make Ginger Vinegar Cordial or Shrub

A shrub is an old-time drink with an acidic base, in this case vinegar. The shrubs I’ve read about call for fruit.

Pairing fruit with vinegar was a way of preserving it without refrigeration, so that, for example, you could have a berry drink in winter, when berries would otherwise not be available.

Julie, in New South Wales, Australia made a ginger flavored version based on this recipe and writes:

“The cordials are generally drunk diluted about 1:10 with water, soda water or rum; we tried ours with lemonade because we had an open bottle in the fridge which needed drinking.

Damn! It’s good!

Sorta kinda like a cross between lemon/lime bitters and ginger ale, to my palate (with the lemonade that is). The cider vinegar gives it a tang on your tongue which feels deceptively alcoholic, except of course, it isn’t, so I reckon it would make the base for an excellent mocktail.

So easy to make too”

Ingredients you’ll need: vinegar, a flavoring (here it’s ginger) and sugar.

Julie notes that “To make a berry shrub, substitute 1½ cups raspberries, blackberries or blueberries for the ginger and reduce the cider vinegar to 2/3 cup for blueberries and ½ cup for raspberries and blackberries.”

Click here to view the full ginger shrub tutorial.

How to Make Soy Milk And Then Tofu

A detailed video tutorial on how to make first soy milk and then tofu from that soy milk. An electric soy milk maker makes the first step fast and easy (you don’t have to watch the pot as when you do it manually, as is demonstrated. I’m not clear on what she is using to curdle the soy milk as she uses both two different names but you can use either nigari (magnesium chloride) or gympsum aka terra alba to curdle the soy milk

Make Fromage Blanc/Farmer’s Cheese

This is a fresh cheese, similar to Indian paneer (except that it isn’t pressed or cut into cubes). This recipe makes a luscious, spreadable, fresh cheese.

Chef John of foodwishes demnostrates how he makes fromage blanc with milk, buttermilk, salt and lemon juice. He notes that the ingredient amounts are crucial — you can view his recipe with exact amounts here.

Making Labneh (Yoghurt Cheese)

Labneh making is pretty straightforward and can be formed into balls and preserved in oil.

Mariam shows us how to make labneh, step by step:

Dede shows us how she makes plain labneh then flavors it:

The labneh I’ve had before (at a restaurant) was over-the-top in a good way rich and creamy, so may guess is how tasty it is is greatly affected by the yoghurt you use and the milk/cream it’s made with.

The labneh can be preserved in oil and in this way stored for months without refrigeration. To do so, the labneh is drained for longer and formed into balls (labneh makboos).

Evelyn write “This is an old-world recipe. It is really just drained, salted yoghurt, very easy to make and very easy to preserve. I guarantee that once you have made these and tasted how delicious they are, they will become a staple in your home.

Read more: http://www.food.com/recipe/yogurt-cheese-labneh-88089#ixzz1pn4sP7oS” and gives this recipe

The recipe proceeds pretty much like Dede and Mariam’s tutorials but instead of draining the yoghurt for 12 hours or overnight you drain the yoghurt for something like 24 hours, until you are able to form the yoghurt into balls, which you then chill in the fridge to firm up further. The balls are then put into a heat sterilized jar and covered with oil.

I assume that getting out as much water as possible is important in being able to preserve these balls – though the active yoghurt culture will also play its part.

Ellie from Home Cooking in Montana adds herbs and spices to the oil she pours over her labneh makbus.

Fizzy Drinks: Beet Kvass

Sarah in Florida shows us how to make a fizzy fermented drink, beet kvass. For this recipe you’ll need beets, whey, salt and water. She mentions that the beets should be fresh and “clean” – so if you grow your own, this would be a great recipe.

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